www.saintfrancisrec.org | (713) 855-1487
2530 Old Louetta Loop, Spring, TX 77388
A REFORMED EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Lydia's Legacy

Lydia's Legacy

 "And a certain woman named Lydia, a seller of purple, of the city of Thyatira, which worshipped God, heard us: whose heart the Lord opened, that she attended unto the things which were spoken of Paul." ~ Acts 16:14

Lydia was a business woman, involved in her community, and defied the cliche that women should be passive sojourners through life. On the contrary, Lydia was productive, a successful merchant, and active in her community. But upon hearing about Jesus’ life, ministry, death and resurrection, she did not gloss over the message as irrelevant to her daily life. Instead she considered the prospect that the accomplishments of this world just might be irrelevant in the economy of eternity and made a decision to give her time and her care to Christian service.

Lydia’s Legacy was formed to give the women of St. Francis an opportunity to come together and be productive, engage in the study of scripture and principles of Christian living, and fellowship with each other. The group also has produced prayer shawls that are given to those in need of a reminder that somebody cares and Christ’s love is real and tangible.

Retreat Series 2014

Praying the Hours  We live in a frantic, frenzied world. We mark our time by deadlines, lines that are leading us to our death. But throughout the ages, Christians have practiced a different way of marking time, of walking the way of the hours. From the earliest times of the tabernacle, Judaism has observed three times to turn away from the busyness of the world and to pray—at morning, at noon, and at evening. The early Christians continued this Jewish practice of praying. In the first few centuries, the early monastic communities began praying at seven specific times of the day, a practice that came to be known as the Liturgy of the Hours. Their practice originated from the phrase in the Psalms, "Seven times a day I praise you.” The Christian prayer of that time consisted of almost the same elements as the Jewish: chanting of psalms, reading of the Old Testament, as well as readings from the Gospels and the Epistles. The Liturgy of the Hours is still observed within Anglicanism, Roman Catholicism, and Eastern Orthodoxy.
         
             In our study, we will briefly examine the history of each hour, but we will concentrate on the spirit of the day in which the time of prayer falls. Our purpose is not to strive to observe the lengthy traditional practices, which would be impossible for those of us outside a monastic community. Rather, we will concentrate on learning to practice the art of pausing at each of these times of the day to reflect on the essence of the hour and to return in our minds to our Maker and His sovereignty over our lives. Join us as we take a pilgrimage through the Benedictine Hours where we take mini-stops in our busy worlds to remember the spirit of each season of the day—from the moment of awakening and resurrection to the moments of waiting and watching for the new dawn.
Lydia’s Legacy invites all of the ladies of the congregation—and
their friends!—to a day of retreat and prayer.

Call Sommer Trebilco for further information.

                    

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